Final Helpful Tips

  1. Recruiting Calendars
  1. The Student-Athlete’s Four Tools for Success
  • Physical Conditioning – You need to train to become an above average athlete in your sport and set yourself above the pack.
  • Academic Performance – Be competitive in your academic work as you are in your athletic pursuits. The “Student” part of the Student-Athlete equation carries equal importance. Work hard in the classroom and get whatever help you need to achieve a respectable GPA and avoid being a high-risk student athlete.
  • Tournament Participation – Play in the right leagues and tournaments to improve your chances of being seen by college recruiters.
  • Work the GPG 10-Step Recruiting Process – Take the proactive approach for coaches to know about you and your skill set. If you notify them about your skills before going to a tournament it is more likely that you will make their list of players to watch at the tournament. Also ensure you have your “ducks in a row” before contacting these coaches. First impressions are important!
  1. Some Final Tips to Qualify for an Athletic Scholarship:
  • There is no magic potion that is going to get you a scholarship. There is a right way (proactive approach by the student-athlete) and a wrong way (being passive or paying for a service that provides for mass emailing of coaches for you) to go about the recruiting process. By using this guide, you will make sure you touch every necessary step in a timely fashion until you sign that National Letter of Intent!
  • Reference the NCAA manual to make sure you are on track to be eligible academically, by taking the correct courses throughout high school. This NCAA manual can be found at ncaa.org
  • Prepare for your SAT/ACT test. Sign up for preparation courses by talking with your school counselor or visit collegeboard.org
  • Train like a college athlete – find a qualified trainer in your town. The most beneficial training is sports-specific, performance training.
  • Get started on the recruiting process early! Right after your freshman season start building a resume and letter to send to coaches. You want to be verbally committed by your junior year!

References

College Board. (2011). “College Admissions – SAT – University and College Search Tool:. www.collegeboard.org, Retrieved 11-3-24

Exact Sports, (2011-02-05). “NCAA and NAIA Scholarships – Know the Difference!” Exact Sports Source, Retrieved 2011-03-13

NAIA. (2011).“Play NAIA” NAIA Eligibility Center. Retrieved 11-3-13

National Center for Education Statistics. (2008)“Fast Facts” Fast Facts. Retrieved 2011-02-23

NCAA.(2011). “Division 1 and 2 tool kit”. NCAA.org. Retrieved 11-3-13

NCAA (2011). “Home School Information”. NCAA. Retrieved 11-1-13

NCAA. (2011) “International Student Athletes Information”. International S-A FAQ’s, Retrieved 11-3-10

NCAA (2011)“Becoming a NCAA Student-Athlete”

http://ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Student-Athlete+Experience/Becoming+a+Student-Athlete/. Retrieved 11-3-13

 

NCAA. (2011). “Recruiting Terms”. NCAA.org. Retrieved 11-3-13

 

NCSA Scholarship Blog. (08-12-11) “Junior Golf Transfer Rules”, NCSA Blog

Retrieved (11-1-23)

 

Sports at College (2010-12-17). “Difference Between NCAA and NAIA”. NAIA vs NCAA Retrieved 2011-04-18


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